A.B. PATERSON COLLEGE
GOLD COAST, QUEENSLAND

Languages

If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to a man in his language, that goes to his heart. – Nelson Mandela

The study of both Japanese and Spanish languages at A.B. Paterson College contributes to the general education of all students.  Students learn that communicating in two or more languages is a rich, challenging experience of engaging with, and participating in, the linguistic and cultural diversity of our interconnected world. Language learning, in general, has shown to boost literacy-related capabilities that prove transferable across learning areas. College students are encouraged to explore and recognise their own linguistic, social, and cultural practices and identities, as well as those associated with speakers of both the Japanese and Spanish languages studied.

At A.B. Paterson College, students learn Japanese and Spanish languages through both interactive and collaborative activities, utilising whiteboard and computer technologies. Through a range of interactive language software and online learning management systems, students learn from highly qualified native speakers, and from speakers who have spent a great deal of time in the target language country.

Junior Japanese

The Junior Japanese course (from Years 4-6) introduces students to Japan’s rich cultural heritage and language. Students learn how to speak about oneself, family, leisure pursuits and hobbies, to name but a few. Both traditional and modern culture is explored with units such as robotics, animation, transport and geography. Japanese script-writing is also introduced.

Junior Spanish

The Junior Spanish course (from Years 4-6) introduces students to Hispanic culture and the rich diversity that exists in the language, dependent upon the country in which it is spoken. Students explore how to recognise Hispanic countries, introduce themselves and their family, how to count, and so forth. Numerous cultural festivals are put under the microscope and Hispanic traditions are compared and contrasted with those of Australian culture.